Understanding And Using The Milton Model 2: What It Is And Why You Need To Know About It

Introduction to the Milton Model In episodes 35, 36, and 37 of the Practical NLP Podcast we learned the Meta Model questions for getting more specific and for, if you will, ‘challenging’ vagueness. Now it’s time to go the other way – communicating at higher levels, vaguer, more abstract levels of the Hierarchy of Ideas […]

Understanding And Using The Milton Model 1: The Hierarchy Of Ideas (‘Chunking’)

The ‘Hierarchy of Ideas’ is something you need to get your head round before you can really understand how NLP language patterns work. Luckily it’s easy to understand. The concept is to do with how abstract or specific your language is, which of course indicates where on the spectrum between overall ‘big picture’ and fine-grained […]

Three Easy Ways To Generate Embedded Suggestions

‘Embedded suggestions’ are suggestions to the listener’s unconscious mind, embedded within a longer sentence that on the surface may be saying something quite different. Embedded suggestions are a concept borrowed from the hypnotic techniques of the ‘father of indirect hypnosis’, Milton Erickson. If you subtly emphasise some parts of a sentence (by tone, or pausing, […]

Why Intonation Matters

A quick explanation of intonation patterns and how you can use them – and how you can sabotage yourself if you’re not aware of them. In the English language, we can notice three types of intonation. Where the voice goes up at the end of the phrase, in English that traditionally indicates a question. Where […]

Peter Capaldi’s Message To Bereaved Boy With Autism: NLP Language Pattern Analysis

Dr Who actor Peter Capaldi’s heartwarming video message to a child with autism who had lost his grandmother has been all over the internet this week, and rightly so. If you’ve not heard about it, here’s a report from The Guardian which is representative of the many that appeared in the English-speaking press. Thomas, who is an avid […]

Practical NLP Podcast episode 32: Presuppositions in Language part 1

In this week’s podcast we start to look at ‘linguistic presuppositions’ or presuppositions in language – the implicit statements embedded in what people say or write that you have to take as true (‘presuppose’) in order to make sense of it. When you can spot these, you can ‘read between the lines’ of what someone […]